Prairie Dog Drill

Definition - What does Prairie Dog Drill mean?

A prairie dog drill is a horizontal earth boring machine typically used to drill holes sizes ranging from 2-inches to 28-inches in trenchless applications. This trenchless equipment is ideal for boring sub-surface horizontal holes from an entry point to an exit point without disturbing pavement or soil layers above the bore.

Trenchlesspedia explains Prairie Dog Drill

The prairie dog drill an ideal tool for boring small to medium holes and is commonly used by utility companies for running water, wastewater, plumbing, electrical, telephone and cable utilities underground. One of the main advantages of the prairie dog drill is its non-destructive method of boring. This allows installation of utilities (for instance, across a road or highway) without having to demolish and reinstate pavement surfaces which can be both costly and time-consuming.

The Prairie Dog Drill machines work by using a high-velocity rotating carbide tipped bit to bore the initial pilot bore. Water is then simultaneously ejected to flush the hole while it is being drilled. If the initial hole needs to be enlarged, an appropriately sized back reamer is attached to the exit hole and pulled back through the hole while cutting in a similar manner as the pilot bit.

Share this: